Theory and the Framers

Limits of Government Can Only Be Discerned by The Understanding

There’s a quote by Alexis de Tocqueville I wanted to share with everyone. It’s perhaps more relevant today than it ever was. The more I teach and give talks on the Constitution, the more I realize just how much the Constitution is an idea that derives its power from the belief that we have in …

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A Reminder From Tocqueville: Why We Love America

I’m taking today to remind everyone what it really means to be an American. Sometimes we have to stop and remind ourselves why we love this country so much. And who better to help remind us than Alexis de Tocqueville? I’m going to let you see America through his eyes today. Read what he said about this country and reflect on what still exists of the value he saw. Then consider if we can restore what has been lost. Click to read further.

Federalist 51: If We’re Going to Debate, Let’s Debate Over Things That Are Real

I’ve been feeding y’all a lot of information recently, with long articles that require heightened mental engagement. So, today I’m going to give you (and myself) a slight mental break and simply discuss with you a topic that has been bothering me. It aligns perfectly with this last quote from Federalist 51. Click to read more.

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Employer (The People), Employee (The Government) and Job Description (The Constitution)

“In the eyes of democracy, government is not a good; it is a necessary evil” (194). “This is seen very clearly in the United States, where wages seem in a way to decrease as the power of officials is greater” (204).  – Alexis de Tocqueville An analogy has been crystalizing in my mind the more I …

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Federalist 78: The Weakest Branch?

“It proves incontestably, that the judiciary is beyond comparison the weakest of the three departments of power; that it can never attack with success either of the other two; and that all possible care is requisite to enable it to defend itself against their attacks.” —Hamilton.

In today’s post, I step through four basic assumptions that Hamilton made about the Court in his Federalist paper entitled The Judiciary Department. Click to read more.

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